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Through polling and research, roundtables, speaking engagements, online events and other public outreach, ASP seeks to improve Americans’ understanding of the security challenges facing the United States, to spur rational and productive dialogue that fosters consensus, and to prescribe substantive, innovative solutions.  

American Competitiveness

Our ability to compete in a global economy, attract the world’s brightest workers and nurture a functional political system is slipping.This weakness is now at a point where it threatens to erode the pillars upon which America’s national security rests. Read More »  

American Security & The Oceans

The Oceans A “Common Heritage of Mankind.” They play an important role in our Nation's transportation, economy, and trade, and they are critical to the global mobility of our Armed Forces. The oceans and the seas are a key part of the maintenance of international peace and security. Read More »

Asymmetric Operations

United States faces many challenges around the world that are complex because they are asymmetric in nature. Asymmetric challenges are those where the different players and components have different interests, resources, and capabilities, but nevertheless interact in complex ways to make policy extremely difficult. Read More »  

Climate Security

Climate change is scientific fact; it is real and poses a clear and present danger not only to the United States but to the entire world. Its effects on our domestic agriculture, infrastructure, economy and public health necessitate straightforward analysis and understanding. Read More »  

Egypt Strategic Partnership

“Egypt’s political and economic success is important, of course, not only for Egyptians, but it’s important for the region, for the United States, and the international community.” - John Kerry, Secretary Of StateEgypt is the most populous and traditionally one of the most influential countries in the region. The United States has had long-term military, cultural and economic links with the country. Read More »  

Energy Security

For the United States, energy use is a security issue.Analytically, ‘energy security’ is difficult to quantify. President Jimmy Carter defined energy security in a 1977 speech as “independence of economic and political action” in international affairs. The United States should be able to define its interests overseas independently from how it uses energy domestically. Read More »  

Fusion Energy

FUSION ENERGY IS REAL. IT’S HAPPENING NOW IN LABS AROUND THE WORLD.Fusion is energy released by forcing atomic nuclei together—the same process that powers the sun. The primary fuel for fusion is derived from ordinary water. Electricity produced from fusion will be safe and clean. It offers hope for an ideal energy source, both in terms of our security and our environment. Read More »  

National Security & Climate Change

www.NationalSecurityandClimateChange.org Helicopter and SoldiersIn 2014-2015, the American Security Project (ASP) is undertaking a grassroots effort to build a consensus among Americans around the country from left to right, and especially among the non-political, that climate change is not simply a low-priority ‘green’ issue: it is a pressing national security threat, and should be treated as such. Read More »  

National Security & Space

At present the Unites States is reliant on Russian rocket engines to launch our reconnaissance satellites.Not only does this reliance have direct implications for our national security launch capabilities, it also means we are funding Russian space and missile technology, while we could be investing in US based jobs and the defense industrial base. The American Security Project is examining these key issues, educating the public and policy makers of the implications of our present approach as well as suggesting ways to further enhance our national security. Read More »  

National Security Strategy

We live in a time when the threats to our security are as complex and diverse as terrorism, the spread of weapons of mass destruction, climate change, failing states and economic decline.Many of these national challenges will require responses that go beyond military might and utilize all the tools at our disposal. The American Security Project is leading the development of a new national security vision and strategy that will create a New American Arsenal for the twenty-first century that is responsive to the challenges and opportunities we face as a country. Read More »  

Nuclear Security

The spread of nuclear weapons and increasing numbers of nuclear forces worldwide represents the greatest danger to mankind. Since President Eisenhower first proposed an Open Skies Treaty with the Soviet Union, successive American presidents have sought to advance U.S. nuclear security through international treaties and agreements to reduce the dangers posed by nuclear weapons and to create strategic stability. Read More »  

Public Diplomacy and Strategic Communication

The American Security Project defines public diplomacy as:Communication and relationship building with foreign publics for the purpose of achieving a foreign policy objective. Read More »
  • American Competitiveness

    Our ability to compete in a global economy, attract the world’s brightest workers and nurture a functional political system is slipping.

    This weakness is now at a point where it threatens to erode the pillars upon which America’s national security rests.

    America’s competitiveness is now a matter of national security.

    We need to acknowledge that current policies and objectives in the public and private sector, taken together, dangerously undercut America’s current and future global position through instability, inefficiency and risk.

    America’s political and business leaders must understand that improving our nation’s competitiveness is an urgent priority with much higher stakes than is acknowledged today.

    Read More »

  • American Security & The Oceans

    The Oceans - A “Common Heritage of Mankind.”

    They play an important role in our Nation's transportation, economy, and trade, and they are critical to the global mobility of our Armed Forces. The oceans and the seas are a key part of the maintenance of international peace and security.

    Since before our country's founding in 1776, America has been a maritime power. As such, our economic well-being and our national security has always rested on the oceans. In our early years, America's growth rested on the protection that both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans afforded our country. In the 21st Century, we know that no ocean can protect us from global challenges like terrorism, nuclear security, or in cyberspace. However, how we manage the oceans is a signal about how our country can manage the world’s commons.

    America has a unique role to secure the oceans for the benefit of mankind. Unlike territory on land, no army can take and hold the oceans. Securing the oceans does not come from military might alone. Instead, it comes from strategic foresight, planning, and international cooperation. America needs a strategic vision for how to manage common challenges. ASP’s work on the Law of the Sea Treaty, in the Arctic, and on Climate Change are a part of our work on the oceans.

    Read More »

  • Asymmetric Operations

    United States faces many challenges around the world that are complex because they are asymmetric in nature. Asymmetric challenges are those where the different players and components have different interests, resources, and capabilities, but nevertheless interact in complex ways to make policy extremely difficult.

    At the American Security Project, we think navigating asymmetric challenges begins with a clear articulation of U.S. interests. From there, the role American power should play becomes clear, and from understanding that role we can craft good policy to support our interests. Without dogma or partisanship, we seek long term solutions to the challenges facing the nation.

    There are many different ways ASP understands and analyzes asymmetric challenges and operations effect national security.

    Read More »

  • Climate Security

    Climate change is scientific fact; it is real and poses a clear and present danger not only to the United States but to the entire world. Its effects on our domestic agriculture, infrastructure, economy and public health necessitate straightforward analysis and understanding.
    506_Earlg15b
    THE FACTS ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE: Climate change is a significant and lasting change in the distribution of weather patterns over periods of time ranging from decades to millions of years. What differentiates today’s climate is the fact that the Earth is warming at a faster rate than ever before and humans have played a major role in the change. The projected increase of up to 11˚F over the next century would dramatically alter the stable climate in which human civilization developed. Consider that the difference between today’s climate and the ice age, when massive glaciers covered the northern hemisphere, was a mere 9˚F. Carbon dioxide is one of multiple greenhouse gases (GHGs) which trap heat in the atmosphere. These gases are necessary for sustaining life on earth because they trap energy from the sun. The greenhouse effect is the process by which the earth retains heat.
    factorysmoke
    While carbon dioxide (CO2) levels have varied over time, there is compelling evidence that the current trends are both unprecedented and man-made. This rise in temperature corresponds directly with a global surge in CO2 emissions beginning during the Industrial Revolution. Levels are up almost 40% since then, from approximately 285 ppm in the late 1800s to over 396 parts per million (ppm) in August 2012. CO2 levels have been rising at an average annual rate of about 2.0 ppm per year over the past decade.

    Read More »

  • Egypt Strategic Partnership

    “Egypt’s political and economic success is important, of course, not only for Egyptians, but it’s important for the region, for the United States, and the international community.” - John Kerry, Secretary Of State

    Egypt is the most populous and traditionally one of the most influential countries in the region. The United States has had long-term military, cultural and economic links with the country.

    Recently, due in part to lack of knowledge and understanding of political change in Egypt, that relationship has faltered.

    Read More »

  • Energy Security

    For the United States,

    energy is a security issue.

    Co. E, 2/4 conducts combat patrols for Mountain Training Exercise 3-14

    ASP defines energy security as the ability for a country to act in its foreign policy independently of how it uses energy domestically.

    ‘Energy security’ is not ‘energy independence’ in the sense that all of the energy used in the United States comes from within its borders without international trade. This is neither obtainable nor desirable in a globalized world. Energy security does not depend on the percentage of supply that is imported. In a world of globally traded commodities, it is no longer possible to be truly energy independent: even domestically produced energy sources are subject to fluctuations in global commodity markets.

    Read More »

  • Fusion Energy

    FUSION ENERGY IS REAL. IT’S HAPPENING NOW IN LABS AROUND THE WORLD.

    Fusion is energy released by forcing atomic nuclei together—the same process that powers the sun. The primary fuel for fusion is derived from ordinary water.

    Electricity produced from fusion will be safe and clean. It offers hope for an ideal energy source, both in terms of our security and our environment.

    The question is whether or not the United States will lead in the commercialization of this technology or whether we will depend on others for our energy.

    Read More »

  • National Security & Climate Change

    www.NationalSecurityandClimateChange.org
    Helicopter and SoldiersIn 2014-2015, the American Security Project (ASP) is undertaking a grassroots effort to build a consensus among Americans around the country from left to right, and especially among the non-political, that climate change is not simply a low-priority ‘green’ issue: it is a pressing national security threat, and should be treated as such.

    Read More »

  • National Security & Space

    At present the Unites States is reliant on Russian rocket engines to launch our reconnaissance satellites.

    Not only does this reliance have direct implications for our national security launch capabilities, it also means we are funding Russian space and missile technology, while we could be investing in US based jobs and the defense industrial base.

    The American Security Project is examining these key issues, educating the public and policy makers of the implications of our present approach as well as suggesting ways to further enhance our national security.

    Read More »

  • National Security Strategy

    We live in a time when the threats to our security are as complex and diverse as terrorism, the spread of weapons of mass destruction, climate change, failing states and economic decline.

    Many of these national challenges will require responses that go beyond military might and utilize all the tools at our disposal. The American Security Project is leading the development of a new national security vision and strategy that will create a New American Arsenal for the twenty-first century that is responsive to the challenges and opportunities we face as a country.

    Read More »

  • Nuclear Security

    The spread of nuclear weapons and increasing numbers of nuclear forces worldwide represents the greatest danger to mankind.

    Since President Eisenhower first proposed an Open Skies Treaty with the Soviet Union, successive American presidents have sought to advance U.S. nuclear security through international treaties and agreements to reduce the dangers posed by nuclear weapons and to create strategic stability.

    ASP seeks to build upon that legacy and educate the public about the leadership needed to build a new international consensus for nuclear security.

    U.S. policymakers are taking a serious look at the future of our nuclear deterrent and the size of the future nuclear. Reportedly, the proposals for a 21st century nuclear force ranges from reducing to a few hundred to the status quo deployed force of 1550. Most agree that it’s time to take a hard look the nuclear force the U.S. wants and needs.

    Read More »

  • Public Diplomacy and Strategic Communication

    The American Security Project defines public diplomacy as: Communication and relationship building with foreign publics for the purpose of achieving a foreign policy objective. Public diplomacy is a vital aspect of our national security strategy and must also inform the policy making process. Paraphrasing Edward R. Murrow, President Kennedy's Director of the United States Information Agency (USIA), public diplomacy must be in on the take-offs of policy and not just the crash landings. In the 20+ years since the end of the Cold War, the United States has yet to establish a defining role for public diplomacy in the context of its foreign relations.

    Read More »

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